Why is Voyager 1 not where it's supposed to be?

First, some background information: Today I tried to find the Voyager 1 probe. I knew there were plenty of guides on how to get to it, but I wanted to see if I could find it on my own just by looking at star maps. I started by looking at this image on Wikipedia that shows the path the probe traced/will trace in the sky between launch and 2030 (yes yes yes I know it's 3304 in the game, just bear with me, everything will be explained):


1024px-Voyager_1_skypath_1977-2030.png


Now, as you can see, the farther from Earth the probe gets, the less the movement of the Earth and the Sun will affect its apparent location, so its movement appears to slow down (makes sense, because angular velocity is tangential velocity divided by distance). Therefore, even though this diagram doesn't show the probe's trajectory after 2030, we can still extrapolate from the data we have and make a reasonably good guess that in the year 3304, it's going to be somewhere between or at least very close to the three stars (Alpha Ophiuchi, Alpha Herculis and Kappa Ophiuchi) near the end of the trajectory.

So I started supercruising in that direction and stopped at a distance of 2,317,400 ls from the Sun. I flew around for a bit and... there was nothing there. I was completely stumped so I decided to watch this video and try his method to make sure I had done everything correctly:

[video=youtube;a-D2Nz5Vx2M]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-D2Nz5Vx2M[/video]

So the guy starts flying towards a system called Beronii. Beronii seems to be a fictional system, but HIP 62500 (in-game designation HR 4860) is in almost exactly the same direction. I look it up on Stellarium... and it's in a completely different direction! α Oph and κ Oph are in the Ophiuchus constellation and α Herculis is in the neighboring Hercules constellation. HIP 62500, on the other hand, is in the Hydra constellation.

I then hop back in the game to confirm my findings and, indeed, the two places are nowhere near each other. Here's where Beronii (and HIP 62500) is as viewed from the Sun:

ljKLjts.png


And this is where HIP 84308, a star right in the middle of the triangle formed by α Oph, κ Oph and α Herculis, is:

4oyFI8u.png


I also marked all of this stuff on a star map (Ophiuchus and Hercules in red, Hydra in yellow):

zKua2WC
zKua2WC.png


The blue cross is (roughly) where the spacecraft would actually be in 3304, and the green cross is where it is in the game. Looking at the right ascension scale at the bottom, there's a 5 hour difference between the two locations. 24 hours is equal to 360 degrees, so 5 hours corresponds to 72 degrees (which matches the screenshots - my FOV is probably something like 75-80). Seventy-two degrees! There's absolutely no way the probe's angular position would've changed so much even in 1200+ years since it's flying more or less directly away from the Sun and towards Ophiuchus. 1200 years is a blink of an eye on astronomical timescales.

So my question is, why is Voyager 1 not where it's supposed to be? Is it a bug? Did someone move the probe to mess with us? Did FDev intentionally put it there "because reasons"? Or do they not have anyone with basic astronomy knowledge who could've made sure they put the damn thing in the right place?
 
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I think it was Thargoids. It's almost impossible to avoid a gentle bump into the probe when you are there.
 
You can clearly see the male here with his hand up asking for directions!

http://planetary.s3.amazonaws.com/assets/images/art/20160116_pioneer-plaque.jpg

Actually he's just waving hello. If you noticed the woman is turned toward him saying "Why don't you ask for directions?"
His reply " Don't worry...I know exactly where we are. Can't you see we're standing on a road map!"

To his credit he was going to ask when they stopped for lunch but she said, "That place is to fancy, and I'm not dressed for it." So they just traveled on.
 
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Actually he's just waving hello. If you noticed the woman is turned toward him saying "Why don't you ask for directions?"
His reply " Don't worry...I know exactly where we are. Can't you see we're standing on a road map!"

To his credit he was going to ask when they stopped for lunch but she said, "That place is to fancy, and I'm not dressed for it." So they just traveled on.

Imagine if we didn't arrive at this post. They'd all still be wondering what happened! It's like a social service.
 
Great analysis! I'm wondering if they just had some faulty data when they placed it. It shouldn't be that far off, even if you account for stellar motion over the next 1300 years, and also light travel time. 72 degrees is huge.
 
First, some background information: Today I tried to find the Voyager 1 probe. I knew there were plenty of guides on how to get to it, but I wanted to see if I could find it on my own just by looking at star maps. I started by looking at this image on Wikipedia that shows the path the probe traced/will trace in the sky between launch and 2030 (yes yes yes I know it's 3304 in the game, just bear with me, everything will be explained):


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipe...30.png/1024px-Voyager_1_skypath_1977-2030.png

Now, as you can see, the farther from Earth the probe gets, the less the movement of the Earth and the Sun will affect its apparent location, so its movement appears to slow down (makes sense, because angular velocity is tangential velocity divided by distance). Therefore, even though this diagram doesn't show the probe's trajectory after 2030, we can still extrapolate from the data we have and make a reasonably good guess that in the year 3304, it's going to be somewhere between or at least very close to the three stars (Alpha Ophiuchi, Alpha Herculis and Kappa Ophiuchi) near the end of the trajectory.

So I started supercruising in that direction and stopped at a distance of 2,317,400 ls from the Sun. I flew around for a bit and... there was nothing there. I was completely stumped so I decided to watch this video and try his method to make sure I had done everything correctly:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-D2Nz5Vx2M

So the guy starts flying towards a system called Beronii. Beronii seems to be a fictional system, but HIP 62500 (in-game designation HR 4860) is in almost exactly the same direction. I look it up on Stellarium... and it's in a completely different direction! α Oph and κ Oph are in the Ophiuchus constellation and α Herculis is in the neighboring Hercules constellation. HIP 62500, on the other hand, is in the Hydra constellation.

I then hop back in the game to confirm my findings and, indeed, the two places are nowhere near each other. Here's where Beronii (and HIP 62500) is as viewed from the Sun:

https://i.imgur.com/ljKLjts.png?1

And this is where HIP 84308, a star right in the middle of the triangle formed by α Oph, κ Oph and α Herculis, is:

https://i.imgur.com/4oyFI8u.png?1

I also marked all of this stuff on a star map (Ophiuchus and Hercules in red, Hydra in yellow):

https://imgur.com/zKua2WChttps://i.imgur.com/zKua2WC.png?1

The blue cross is (roughly) where the spacecraft would actually be in 3304, and the green cross is where it is in the game. Looking at the right ascension scale at the bottom, there's a 5 hour difference between the two locations. 24 hours is equal to 360 degrees, so 5 hours corresponds to 72 degrees (which matches the screenshots - my FOV is probably something like 75-80). Seventy-two degrees! There's absolutely no way the probe's angular position would've changed so much even in 1200+ years since it's flying more or less directly away from the Sun and towards Ophiuchus. 1200 years is a blink of an eye on astronomical timescales.

So my question is, why is Voyager 1 not where it's supposed to be? Is it a bug? Did someone move the probe to mess with us? Did FDev intentionally put it there "because reasons"? Or do they not have anyone with basic astronomy knowledge who could've made sure they put the damn thing in the right place?

Obviously I don't know how they calculated it, but there's also, I believe its called stellar drift to take into account, the fact that the surrounding stars will move in relation to the sun, add the sun itself also moves in the galaxy, and that those charts are from our perspective, there seems to be a host of potential variables where getting even one incorrect would leave you far off the mark.
What about voyager 2? is it where it should be?
 
Great analysis! I'm wondering if they just had some faulty data when they placed it. It shouldn't be that far off, even if you account for stellar motion over the next 1300 years, and also light travel time. 72 degrees is huge.

Its in interstellar space, how couldn't stellar drift bring it that many degree's away from us, the sun is hurtling around the center of our galaxy and other stars are moving in relation as that as well, so how are we viewing voyager at that time?

to give a slight visual example.

---------------------v------------------
----------------------------------------
----------------------------------------
----------------------------------------
----------1-------------------------2--

does the sun overtake voyager? which should be out of its gravity?

are we at that time viewing from position 1 or 2 angle for us, would change dramatically.

Heck op is showing pictures of stellar locations now last I checked, are they even relevant from our view in 1000 years?

I haven't really looked into it, but there's no way for me to say if OP's calculations are correct or not, I can only say that over 1000 years any single variable being off could voyager in one heck of another position.


Update:
I found an article indicating that in 40000 years voyager will be nearing AC +79 3888, maybe that helps? where is AC +79 3888 on that map?

This is its current location if it helps.
Right ascension: 14h15m39.70s
Declination: +19°10'57.0"
Apparent magnitude: -0.04
Distance: 11.255 parsecs

did of bit of examination and using http://www.sky-map.org
it does indeed seem that voyager at least pure relation wise, should be to the right of the location OP indicates?
 
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