Tenuous Atmospheres: How Will They Work...?

it'll just be coloured sky, won't it?
No idea. The trailer does show Cobras zipping and weaving through the sky, while an Anaconda lumbers around lazily a few metres above the surface. That could point to an atmospheric flight model that favours small ships, but I wouldn't get my hopes up. The Anaconda is clumsy compared to the Cobra in a vacuum, so it probably doesn't mean much.
 
No idea. The trailer does show Cobras zipping and weaving through the sky, while an Anaconda lumbers around lazily a few metres above the surface. That could point to an atmospheric flight model that favours small ships, but I wouldn't get my hopes up. The Anaconda is clumsy compared to the Cobra in a vacuum, so it probably doesn't mean much.
it'll be coloured sky mate
 
I'd give my wisdom teeth to by able to bypass the exclusion zone of current atmospheric planets in the game today. Sure, the textures would degrade as we got further down, but I don't need to land on these to appreciate atmospheric flight, and will modding, who knows what we could achieve?
 
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Was about to say something about re-entry effects, but now that I see these...
Well... Ummm....
What's Mars' current atm? I know that Mars doesn't have that much of an atmosphere, but it still put a strain on our rovers so... maybe?
Present day Mars's surface pressure is 0.88 psi according to Wikipedia, which translates to 0.006 ATM.

So some of these are definitely thicker than Mars.
 
But still enough to cause heating effects when entering at high enough speeds.

Hmmm....
Could be! And possibly some mild aerodynamic effects on the bigger, brickier ships when at high speed.

I guess we'll just have to wait and see. It's not a dealbreaker, but it's the sort of nuance that would be nice to see and show that they are taking the depth of the game more seriously in this update.
 
But still enough to cause heating effects when entering at high enough speeds.

Hmmm....
Orbital velocities yes. "Normal Space" velocity in ED, probably not. "Glide" velocity in ED, yes. "Supercruise" velocity in ED, instant death. I suspect we'll see a modified "Glide" stage, perhaps with a new heatshield module, for entry into tenuous atmosphere.

Cheers,

Drew.
 
Orbital velocities yes. "Normal Space" velocity in ED, probably not most of the time. "Glide" velocity in ED, yes. "Supercruise" velocity in ED, instant death. I suspect we'll see a modified "Glide" stage, perhaps with a new heatshield module, for entry into tenuous atmosphere.

Cheers,

Drew.
Black - red - blue

Be still my beating heart 😜
 
Was about to say something about re-entry effects, but now that I see these...
Well... Ummm....
What's Mars' current atm? I know that Mars doesn't have that much of an atmosphere, but it still put a strain on our rovers so... maybe?
You would certainly get reentry effects if you slammed into Mars' atmosphere at several km/s, as probes sent from Earth on Hohmann transfer orbits do. At Earth orbital speed, reentry plasma heating starts around 70 km up, where the air is significantly thinner than at Mars, too.

Of course, ED spaceships don't currently do that. They cruise up to the edge of the atmosphere in their warp bubbles, glide in to around 10 km altitude at 2.5 km/s, and finally drop into Newtonian space at a few hundred m/s. I'm not sure that would cause any visible heating effects at these low pressures.
 
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