My HOTAS just broke

The hat on my X52 Pro throttle didn't recognise "up" anymore, which is quite important for take off (lateral thrust). Tried reinstalling the drivers, using a different USB port, etc. Nothing worked. Don't know how to convince my wife that a new HOTAS is essential for playing Elite. So out of frustation is just bought Greedfall.

Turns out that moving the throttle forth and back fixed the issue...
 
My 3d pro decided the same with trigger 2 and hat down.
Turns out, it's 5 years old and for some reason a new one from the same electronics chain is now 30 euro more expensive than it was.
This is all Painite's doing.
 
Well, HOTAS don't live forever. I will need to buy a new set too, because some buttons on my Saitek X52Pro developped the bounce behavior. Especially the B button on right stick and also the button under the red "SAFE" piece of plastic which I am using for hardpoints enable. :(
Will need to buy a new set soon.
 
If you mined too, those hotspots would be used up faster.
Clearly this means it is you who is responsible.
And you thought you could get away with it.
I dont follow your logic. You lost me at "it is you." Why/how would I do something like that? Your not the only person painite mining you know
 
It is possible that a wire broke inside. I had that on my X55 on the throttle, then the joystick. Soldered the wire back to the circuit board. Of course if it is old, it is possible the hat switch wore out. I have not replaced a hat switch button yet, but you may be able to. I have done similar things with other electronics like battery chargers, just replace the bad button.
 
Turns out that moving the throttle forth and back fixed the issue...
Could be a broken wire.

The first symptom on my old X-55 was the pinky rocker, which stopped working when at full throttle. Pulling the stick back a little brought the rocker back to life. Turned out the wire was broken and basically held together just by the rubber/plastic casing. At full throttle the wires straightened out making the broke one lose contact.
 
My old X52, after a decade of faithful service, finally decided to randomly roll the ship to the right back when I first started playing a few years back. No stick I’ve had since has really warmed my heart like that one did (not even the Pro version, which caused nothing but blue screens and was promptly ditched for a T.16000M).

Sure, the 16000 is a great bit of kit, but it isn’t as interesting to look at.
 
The hat on my X52 Pro throttle didn't recognise "up" anymore, which is quite important for take off (lateral thrust). Tried reinstalling the drivers, using a different USB port, etc. Nothing worked. Don't know how to convince my wife that a new HOTAS is essential for playing Elite. So out of frustation is just bought Greedfall.

Turns out that moving the throttle forth and back fixed the issue...
Sounds more like a case for a decent contact spray to me rather than a software problem.
 
Broken switches on HOTAS solutions are not that uncommon, with some sticks even some of the analog axis can become unstable or fail completely. You can not get around the fact that hardware will eventually fail as it gets used more and more often - especially mechanical parts.

With Logitech buying out Saitek a couple of years back a Logitech redesigned X52 may actually be more reliable - I certainly have found logitech sticks to be mechanically more reliable than their Saitek brethren - especially the Logitech Extreme 3D Pro, that stick has a solid reputation with me for mechanical reliability.

My Thrustmaster Warthog has had a couple of failed switches on it but I have replaced it with a Logitech X56 and so far have been happy with it. I may try to source replacement switches for the Warthog and fix it myself at some point but I can not see me do the same for the X56 if that fails.
 
I have both the X52 Pro (Pre-Logitech/Saitek) and the X55 (Pre-Logitech/Saitek) and both still work fine. I retired my X52 only because I bought the X55. The X52 Pro must be eight or ten years old now, and I bought the X55 used on E-Bay. Neither has given me any bit of trouble. I'm actually awed when folks break them. Those who do must crank them hard, or play tons of hours with many games. I hardly have to push or pull to get the response I want. I also still have an analog Thrustmaster TopGun Hotas which still works, although USB has replaced the old dedicated PC joystick connectors. Be nice to your equipment and it will last a lifetime.
 
Be nice to your equipment and it will last a lifetime.
There is a reason that mechanical/electrical/electronic devices have a stated MTBF and limited warranties - ALL mechanical/electrical/electronic kit has a natural life expectancy (either in terms of number of operations or actual time) regardless of how well you treat them, toggle switches and buttons for example can only survive a certain number of activations before failing - some will fail sooner than expected, some will last longer, but most will last about the notionally rated number of activations before failing.

This applies to most computer hardware - gaming controllers are no exception and even the most reliable kit will eventually fail at some point. The older the kit is, the more likely it is to fail.
 
There is a reason that mechanical/electrical/electronic devices have a stated MTBF and limited warranties - ALL mechanical/electrical/electronic kit has a natural life expectancy (either in terms of number of operations or actual time) regardless of how well you treat them, toggle switches and buttons for example can only survive a certain number of activations before failing - some will fail sooner than expected, some will last longer, but most will last about the notionally rated number of activations before failing.

This applies to most computer hardware - gaming controllers are no exception and even the most reliable kit will eventually fail at some point. The older the kit is, the more likely it is to fail.
That's what the modern industry wants to make you believe. My 20+ years old sidewinder ff2 is still in a perfect shape, after all these years in heavy use.
Just saying... they could build durable hardware - if they wanted. But apparently that's bad for business and as long as users are daft enough to by the same crap over and over again, there's nothing to change this situation anytime soon. We are all very industry-friendly. :p
 
Just because something is old, doesn't mean it's useless or going to break. I still have my original Apple II and I start it up on an old green screen CRT monitor, as well as my original Commadore 128, which still has the original floppy drives and original 4-axis joystick/controller. I still play 1984 Elite on it as I have the original floppies it came with.

I do agree that any electrical/electronic or machanical device is subject to failure given the MTBF rated on equipment now days. Some of us are just lucky in that regard. I had one of the first fuel injection cars when they first came out, and no matter what the dealer did to it, it refused to run properly. I finally got the dealer to eat the cost of the vehicle and he took it back for the full purchase price. Some stuff is junk and some stuff will never die. There has to be something said for a users care of an item as well.
 
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