Looking for New HOTAS advice

As black, you are referring to the one that has gray markings and not blue ones? I've seen it with red lights on pictures, but also bottom row lights on the Throttle yellow and blue on the side. Can you change the colours as such on the Logitech?

Now you got me curious about the X56. I like using quality gear, but the problem is; I don't enjoy Elite these days as much and Star Citizen is still a chore more often than not (due to bugs and glitches). How could I justify the investment... 🤔 Anyway, thanks for the infos.
I have been using mine for two days now and can't understand the posts saying poor quality bla bla bla. It is certainly way better quality in feel and use than my old Thrustmaster X Hotas which lasted me 6yrs before the yaw function got so much drift it made a new buy necessary. The X56 is solid and while researching various Hotas replacements it is clear that the bad ones were the last batch of Saitek ones with the blue on black design Logitech inherited. Logitech have since changed the spec and improved the new ones with the black and silvery/grey design.

There are three colour bands in the settings red, green and blue, each of which can be stylised giving a decent spectrum of colours including the red on the bottom and blue down the side. When I got it I followed the instructions by first installing the software downloaded from the Logitech site. As with my old Hotas I calibrated it from the Windows devices and printers screen icon. The first time I played after setting the binds I did notice that the joystick was very imprecise and thought I might test out the springs to see if that helped. After watching a review video on You Tube I decided to calibrate the X56 from the Logitech settings panel instead of in Windows and what a difference from before, now the joystick is seriously precise. I had been using a small hauler I bought for testing as I wanted to keep rebuy costs low in the event of a disaster but immediately went back and retrieved my Corvette from storage before taking a few missions and immediately flew through the letterbox as easy as going through the eye of a needle.

If you have the funds, play several flight sim/ space sim games a lot then I suppose long term the really expensive gear is good economics but if like me you play a couple of hours daily on ED or other game then the X56 is more than adequate in my opinion. Another thing not mentioned is the fact that some people are heavy handed and I suspect many of the problems written about here about faulty products etc are more to do with playing styles. I myself am very light handed and my old Hotas X lasted me 6yrs before the yaw and a somewhat imprecise hat switch made me get a new hotas. 90% or so of my old Hotas X controls are still working perfectly well after 6yrs and this in a unit that cost me £35 at the time. So with sensible use there is no reason to doubt that the X56 @ £215 should far outlast that. In fact I am 70yrs old so it will likely outlast me as well. :cool:
 
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I have been using mine for two days now and can't understand the posts saying poor quality bla bla bla. It is certainly way better quality in feel and use than my old Thrustmaster X Hotas which lasted me 6yrs before the yaw function got so much drift it made a new buy necessary. The X56 is solid and while researching various Hotas replacements it is clear that the bad ones were the last batch of Saitek ones with the blue on black design Logitech inherited. Logitech have since changed the spec and improved the new ones with the black and silvery/grey design.

There are three colour bands in the settings red, green and blue, each of which can be stylised giving a decent spectrum of colours including the red on the bottom and blue down the side. When I got it I followed the instructions by first installing the software downloaded from the Logitech site. As with my old Hotas I calibrated it from the Windows devices and printers screen icon. The first time I played after setting the binds I did notice that the joystick was very imprecise and thought I might test out the springs to see if that helped. After watching a review video on You Tube I decided to calibrate the X56 from the Logitech settings panel instead of in Windows and what a difference from before, now the joystick is seriously precise. I had been using a small hauler I bought for testing as I wanted to keep rebuy costs low in the event of a disaster but immediately went back and retrieved my Corvette from storage before taking a few missions and immediately flew through the letterbox as easy as going through the eye of a needle.

If you have the funds, play several flight sim/ space sim games a lot then I suppose long term the really expensive gear is good economics but if like me you play a couple of hours daily on ED or other game then the X56 is more than adequate in my opinion. Another thing not mentioned is the fact that some people are heavy handed and I suspect many of the problems written about here about faulty products etc are more to do with playing styles. I myself am very light handed and my old Hotas X lasted me 6yrs before the yaw and a somewhat imprecise hat switch made me get a new hotas. 90% or so of my old Hotas X controls are still working perfectly well after 6yrs and this in a unit that cost me £35 at the time. So with sensible use there is no reason to doubt that the X56 @ £215 should far outlast that. In fact I am 70yrs old so it will likely outlast me as well. :cool:
It's nice that you give so expert feedback after a full two days of use. I dare to say that yes, within the first weeks of having the device i also had no problems. (Once i solved the often reported problem of it the device being power hungry by getting a powered USB hub. )

On throwing it around or handling it badly: i also don't agree there. The devices are screwed to my table, so unless i start throwing around the table the chance of them being tossed around, bruised or anything like that are rather low.
[Also, i have a small metal plate taped to the top, where a plush pet with a magnet inside is being held in place. Even just moving the stick like 50% to the side and releasing it is enough that the pet goes flying, and i use the second weakest centering spring. Yet the pet is fine there, even when i do combat flying, be it Elite Dangerous or Rebel Galaxy Outlaw. So again, i am rather sure that my handling of the stick is not too wild. ]

Yet over the years, i went through a number of X55/X56es. The old Saitek ones broke down once a year and the usual problem was broken wires. (So, i always was able to replace them on warranty. )

The new Logitech device lasted for 3 years and 4 months and the first defect now was that a soldering broke. It was a wire in the grip. I resoldered it, the device is fine again, but when i next time have to open the joysticks grip, i will also use a little glue to fix them in position. The wire currently is dangling down from the top of the joystick. The plate where the POV and 4 way switches are attached is where the cable bundle from goes to from the base, from there on it's loose wires going to all the other buttons. So as the wires are soldered to the plate and the switch, but not held in place by any other means, they are subject to gravitation when moving the joystick. And movement, no matter if fast or slow, results in them also moving a little bit.

One of the Saitek built sticks i opened later. (I have one spare, as one time support just told me to cut off the USB cables and send a picture to confirm that i disabled the device and then sent me a new one. ) The wires in there are still of the "solid core" type. (Excuse if the term is not correct, my am not sure on the proper english term here. ) In the newer Logitech device, when i opened it up, i found the wires to be have a mesh core.

This means that the cables indeed are of higher quality and less prone of breaking. I am quite confident that the higher quality of the cables is the reason why the stick lasted about three times as long as its Saitek-built predecessors. But where the wires are soldered in place, the soldering eliminates the flexibility. So logically, that's where it broke. It's a very logical consequence of how the wires are put into the device, without being held in place at other places than where they were soldered to the board and switch.

So yes, both from how long my device lasted without problems and on what i saw on the wires, Logitech improved some parts compared to the old Saitek/Madcatz version. But while the parts are of better quality, some of the inherent problems could only be properly fixed by completely redesigning the devices internals. As it's unlikely that Logitech will do that, higher than usual wear and tear is simple designed into the device and will happen, no matter how carefully and properly you use it.
 
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It's nice that you give so expert feedback after a full two days of use. I dare to say that yes, within the first weeks of having the device i also had no problems. (Once i solved the often reported problem of it the device being power hungry by getting a powered USB hub. )

On throwing it around or handling it badly: i also don't agree there. The devices are screwed to my table, so unless i start throwing around the table the chance of them being tossed around, bruised or anything like that are rather low.
[Also, i have a small metal plate taped to the top, where a plush pet with a magnet inside is being held in place. Even just moving the stick like 50% to the side and releasing it is enough that the pet goes flying, and i use the second weakest centering spring. Yet the pet is fine there, even when i do combat flying, be it Elite Dangerous or Rebel Galaxy Outlaw. So again, i am rather sure that my handling of the stick is not too wild. ]

Yet over the years, i went through a number of X55/X56es. The old Saitek ones broke down once a year and the usual problem was broken wires. (So, i always was able to replace them on warranty. )

The new Logitech device lasted for 3 years and 4 months and the first defect now was that a soldering broke. It was a wire in the grip. I resoldered it, the device is fine again, but when i next time have to open the joysticks grip, i will also use a little glue to fix them in position. The wire currently is dangling down from the top of the joystick. The plate where the POV and 4 way switches are attached is where the cable bundle from goes to from the base, from there on it's loose wires going to all the other buttons. So as the wires are soldered to the plate and the switch, but not held in place by any other means, they are subject to gravitation when moving the joystick. And movement, no matter if fast or slow, results in them also moving a little bit.

One of the Saitek built sticks i opened later. (I have one spare, as one time support just told me to cut off the USB cables and send a picture to confirm that i disabled the device and then sent me a new one. ) The wires in there are still of the "solid core" type. (Excuse if the term is not correct, my am not sure on the proper english term here. ) In the newer Logitech device, when i opened it up, i found the wires to be have a mesh core.

This means that the cables indeed are of higher quality and less prone of breaking. I am quite confident that the higher quality of the cables is the reason why the stick lasted about three times as long as its Saitek-built predecessors. But where the wires are soldered in place, the soldering eliminates the flexibility. So logically, that's where it broke. It's a very logical consequence of how the wires are put into the device, without being held in place at other places than where they were soldered to the board and switch.

So yes, both from how long my device lasted without problems and on what i saw on the wires, Logitech improved some parts compared to the old Saitek/Madcatz version. But while the parts are of better quality, some of the inherent problems could only be properly fixed by completely redesigning the devices internals. As it's unlikely that Logitech will do that, higher than usual wear and tear is simple designed into the device and will happen, no matter how carefully and properly you use it.
I never said or even implied that every player having problems with the X56 was misusing it but that some are?. Unless I am mistaken you are more or less saying that the main problem in your experience going wrong with the new Logitech X56 series is solder joints going bad. This is unfortunate but I understand how this happens. For many years now I have repaired and built guitars and around 5-10 years back new laws were brought in banning lead based solder due to health concerns on the fumes being cancerous. Now here in Europe it is illegal to sell lead based solder and therefore all modern soldering is done using silver solder. Silver solder needs more heat in general in my experience and doesn't blend as good as lead based. I have had guitars from as early as the 1950's on my workbench and although it does happen at times the old lead solder is still good after that long unless I find a cold solder joint or a pot or pickup has been changed out. On the other hand I get a lot of work resoldering newer guitars where I often find the cause of the problem being cold solder joints due I believe to the silver solder requirements. In general iI would say that not only Logitech but any company using soldered products will have a higher percentage of rejects due to this.
 
I never said or even implied that every player having problems with the X56 was misusing it but that some are?. Unless I am mistaken you are more or less saying that the main problem in your experience going wrong with the new Logitech X56 series is solder joints going bad. This is unfortunate but I understand how this happens. For many years now I have repaired and built guitars and around 5-10 years back new laws were brought in banning lead based solder due to health concerns on the fumes being cancerous. Now here in Europe it is illegal to sell lead based solder and therefore all modern soldering is done using silver solder. Silver solder needs more heat in general in my experience and doesn't blend as good as lead based. I have had guitars from as early as the 1950's on my workbench and although it does happen at times the old lead solder is still good after that long unless I find a cold solder joint or a pot or pickup has been changed out. On the other hand I get a lot of work resoldering newer guitars where I often find the cause of the problem being cold solder joints due I believe to the silver solder requirements. In general iI would say that not only Logitech but any company using soldered products will have a higher percentage of rejects due to this.
Hmm. On abuse, i basically wanted to clarify that a lot of the problem reports are legit. The reports of what is breaking on the device are quite consistent and mostly are clearly not connected to bad handling. Especially the old Saitek/Madcaz built ones had severe quality issues.

On the part i described on my last problem: it's not the soldering itself, which was faults. It's just the mere fact that soldering elimintes a wires flexibilty on the area where you have lead/silver on it. And the wires inside the device just still move, as they are not properly attached anywhere and thus held in place. (Cable ties exist for a reason, and it's not only to make things look neat. ) As long as the device had the cheap wires, they broke at those places where they experienced most flexing. Now with the better mesh core cables, they seem to break where the soldering eliminates the flexibility of the mesh.

What did surprise me is that this time it was a wire in the stick that broke first. The old wires usually broke first in the throttle. The way they are lead up into the grip means that any time you move the throttle forward or back, they are moved a lot. The way they are lead is not optimal. (Some bending is unavoidable, considering that they go into a moving part. But you could eliminate a lot of the movement by them going down further in front. )

So all in all, Logitech did improve the wires. That much i can now, after fixing my device, that for sure. But the general interior design is the same as before, which just means that i do expect more trouble to come. Time will tell.
 
I thought EdRef main feature is to pull YOUR BINDINGS from file and generate a printable visualizatiin of them 😊
I've never really bothered much with it to be honest, way back when I started with the T hotas X there were some blank printouts on the go and then EDref came about. I think I may have actually uploaded my TX one there just to get a printable version to keep in front of me, a bit like I am doing at the moment with the X56. I always found that most of the uploaded player set ups seem to me to have set stuff on their controllers that are not actually necessary as they can be done when needed ingame. Stuff like mapping, silent running, next target etc are all available in the ingame external/internal menu's.
 
That still is the main feature, but it occurred to me that it can just as easily print the DirectInput names on the diagram, so now we have a button map for each device. It’s also a useful diagnostic for all the diagrams I inherited when I took over the project. Some mistakes came to light as a result.
 
Stuff like mapping, silent running, next target etc are all available in the ingame external/internal menu's.
But ingame menus take time. For this reason I have next/previous target, enemy and subsystem as well as select target ahead bound. When in combat, they are useful and I can use them while still properly flying, instead of switching over to some menu. For similar reasons

I even have select next waypoint in route on a button: when my target uses chaff, I want to deselect it, so my gimbaled weapons behave like fixed. And "select target ahead" is risky. If by chance there is another ship somewhere ahead of you, even at a longer distance, you select that one instead of just deselecting your target, which can get you into trouble. Using next waypoint in route reliably deselects your target, without any such risk.

Silent running also already prevented me from loosing a few ships. It's rare that I want to use that feature, but when I do, it's usually that my shields are down and I am taking a beating and want to break target lock. Would I have to go to the side panel to switch it on, it would've meant too much time digging in the menu instead of properly flying this ship.

Of course it depends on how you are flying and what you are doing, but most of these things can be bound for good reason: to save time in critical situations.
 
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