Release EDDI Scripts and EDDI enabled VA Commands Thread

Another question for you EDDI brainiacs, LOL!

In the Mission Accepted event there is an entry called "expiry". It is not, however, listed in the examples of how to use it so the format is not declared. I was just wondering what is the format of that field. It's supposed to be the expiration date of the mission, so I leaning towards "date" field format. Or is it some other INT or DEC?

Thanx
 
I have a question about scripts like this one:
Code:
{if reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 0.1:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("incredibly fast", retrograde)])}
|elif reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 1:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("extremely fast", retrograde)])}
|elif reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 3:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("unusually fast", retrograde)])}
}
The meaning of "incredibly" is that it is so much rare (so: incredible) to have an orbit so fast (related to what? radius?) or that it is the orbital period, in absolute, being incredibly fast?

'cause i heard values which were not so big, still marked as "incredibly", and in italian this kind of phrasing works only in the latter case.

Dunno if i'm able to explain myself. Basically, there's a lot of code like this and i don't get the real meaning.
 
Last edited:
I have a question about scripts like this one:
Code:
{if reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 0.1:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("incredibly fast", retrograde)])}
|elif reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 1:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("extremely fast", retrograde)])}
|elif reportbody.orbitalperiodprobability < 3:
        {set orbitNotables to cat(orbitNotables, [cat("unusually fast", retrograde)])}
}
The meaning of "incredibly" is that it is so much rare (so: incredible) to have an orbit so fast (related to what? radius?) or that it is the orbital period, in absolute, being incredibly fast?

'cause i heard values which were not so big, still marked as "incredibly", and in italian this kind of phrasing works only in the latter case.

Dunno if i'm able to explain myself. Basically, there's a lot of code like this and i don't get the real meaning.
I've always thought it means that (in this case) the time it takes for the body to make one orbit around the host star, is very fast. So compared to Earth: we have an orbital period of 12 months, so if it were "extremely fast" it might be 6 months, and "incredibly fast" might be 2-3 months or even less.
 
I've always thought it means that (in this case) the time it takes for the body to make one orbit around the host star, is very fast. So compared to Earth: we have an orbital period of 12 months, so if it were "extremely fast" it might be 6 months, and "incredibly fast" might be 2-3 months or even less.
That's what i understand too. But then, why the qualifier (incredibly") is based on the probability of it? That's what confuses me.
I got something like "it has a incredibly fast rotation period of one day". What? It could be incredible if other properties of the planet (size, mass, whatever) make that period extremly rare but if that is the meaning it did'nt arrive to me.
So, since i'm trying to build the "default" italian personality, i'm asking :)
 
That's what i understand too. But then, why the qualifier (incredibly") is based on the probability of it? That's what confuses me.
I got something like "it has a incredibly fast rotation period of one day". What? It could be incredible if other properties of the planet (size, mass, whatever) make that period extremly rare but if that is the meaning it did'nt arrive to me.
So, since i'm trying to build the "default" italian personality, i'm asking :)
Hmm, I see what you mean. Is it compared to Earth? Or maybe compared to other bodies that are that distance from their star? Or maybe something else?

I would guess that it is compared to Earth, because there is no way to compare body X with other alike bodies, at least not without having a huge database to look up similar bodies in. I know EDSM could probably provide the information, but I think that would take too long to process, and would slow EDDI down when reporting. Comparing it to Earth is quick and easy, and only requires knowing the absolute number of days that body X takes to orbit it's star.
 
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