Creating an alt shows me how hard the credits rain down.

Base price of ships are not important op. By the time you hit full A rated price will be most likely x10 times if not more...and even with fully A rated ships engineers made them absolutely terrible compared to what engendered ships are.... so that brings our to your original concern back... 100 million ships is still as trash as 1 mill ship without proper engineering and that’s why this credit rain does not matter tbfh
This. The game is really balanced with engineering in mind. If we didn't progress rather fast toward the point were we have ship we consider keeping (Python, Krait, Asp for exploration,...) then it would be a double whammy grind, as you'd have to engineer your ship AND grind for credit. You don't need to have a ship you can keep, but simply a module on it that are transferable, for example the FSD on an Asp can be used on a Krait, so you can engineer it, and it doesn't feel wasted.

I know I googled hard why my shield, a max size A, on my crusader would go down as fast as it did. I simply didn't understand, it was the best shield possible available to me after all. CZ ships are fully engineered. Pirates ship in mission/res have engineering to.

Eventually, I learned that engineering is not a endgame thing, as I thought it was. This is counter intuitive, most engineering/enchanting, or whatever you call it, in videogames are meant as a way to progress once your gear is maxxed out.


If the game was not balanced with engineering in mind, I wouldn't mind a slower progression. But as it is, it would be terrible.
 
The funny thing is, FDev introduced a credit sink with FCs, but all this did was players, regardless of how advanced they were in the game went and tried to grind them out as fast as they could - probably also attributable to the content drought we went through prior to that, people want new shiny and can't really blame them for that.

Apart from a thorough 'spring clean' re-balancing of every single part of the game I can't really see what else could be done, and that cause a lot of complaints from one player group or another.

Players like myself who get a lot of satisfaction out of navigating progression via financial restrictions (the early Gran Turismos were great examples of this - you start with a banger, you slowly upgrade it, you start to win races, you buy a new car, upgrade that, and so on - growing attached to each car as a result) will just have to kiss this particular aspect goodbye when it comes to Elite unfortunately.
 
2. yes, that requires knowing the game, no question. but while i think it is much harder for a fresh cmdr, it also points out that the difficulty of early game is down to obfuscation/lack of information, while in itself it is not challenging. i think a game like elite could do with a challenging early game, which is not only down to not knowing the game. i know a lot of game, where i can enjoy the early game again and again.

Thank you. This is largely the point. All the posts reminding me that I'm not a newb now... I've acknowledged that. Without the veil of its learning curve there is nothing to this game. The best re-playable games have a progression that means a second play will keep you from making as many tactical errors in how to progress but still prevent the player from "Day 2, max gear and money".

An Elite player is now much like a lab rat in an obesity study. There is a lever that dispenses good balanced food and a lever that dispenses sugar. The rat eventually finds the levers, finds the sugar lever, and kills itself dispensing sugar because the lever always works. Elite has so many credit levers. The player at first doesn't know where to find them so they may have some minor difficulties and setbacks due to early mistakes. But soon enough a lever will be found. Since the lever is ever-present and works with each pull soon enough the need for credits is just obliterated as are all choices and trade-offs in the base equipment.

In some ways I'm saying maybe it's time to embrace that and have some choices for the new commander to start out in a ship that's a bit more capable and that they are more likely to invest time into crafting vs having them start out hunting desperately for a lever to press to get the hell out of this thing. Let them start out in a ship that fits the career path they want to take on. No, I'm not suggesting starting them in Anacondas. But in the better smalls or lower-end mediums. At least there the natural costs of the ships and upgrades fit better into the credit flow. Adjust the ship prices somewhat to account for the incredible credit inflation that has occurred.

As for materials and engineering. I also acknowledge that in my first post. That is the ONLY true economy there is in the game. Some of which is obtained in the most uninteresting game play you can have in Elite. Scooping and scanning. Shooting lumps in the SRV. Only a few types are really natural outgrowths of normal gameplay. Because the credit rain is so hard the natural drop-rate of the mats is terrible. You'll have 3 or 4 ships LONG before you have the materials to customize them all via engineering. Thus the continuous gripes about mat-grinding.

Since I intend to stick to my small ship for a long time with this CMDR I noticed my mat hunger is very low. I get it taken care of in largely organic ways. Though certain mats are still rare and a few are locked into grind methods. I've only really found raw mats via lump-shooting or mining. If you don't enjoy those... too bad, you're going to do them if you want raws. Data also, though it at least is supplemented by missions. What I see however is that if earnings were balanced such that ship progression was gradual that materials for the engineering would be rather on-pace.

My character is about a week old and without any grinding beyond two planetary SRV sessions at vents and one hour scanning wakes I was able to engineer most of my core needs to G2/G3 after unlocking the engineers which includes the one-time cost of leveling them up. Now that's only true because I don't have three ships I'm trying to get done. At that level the ship is more than capable of just about all the fighting the game will throw at me. Even just A rated the ship was effective, not 'trash' but certainly a challenge to beat up-level NPCs still.

Anyway, I'm whistling into the wind. I'm close to 5000hrs into it so I can't say there's nothing in it for me. Just think it's a shame they have so badly screwed up the credit progression over time.
 
Last edited:
This. The game is really balanced with engineering in mind. If we didn't progress rather fast toward the point were we have ship we consider keeping (Python, Krait, Asp for exploration,...) then it would be a double whammy grind, as you'd have to engineer your ship AND grind for credit. You don't need to have a ship you can keep, but simply a module on it that are transferable, for example the FSD on an Asp can be used on a Krait, so you can engineer it, and it doesn't feel wasted.

I know I googled hard why my shield, a max size A, on my crusader would go down as fast as it did. I simply didn't understand, it was the best shield possible available to me after all. CZ ships are fully engineered. Pirates ship in mission/res have engineering to.

Eventually, I learned that engineering is not a endgame thing, as I thought it was. This is counter intuitive, most engineering/enchanting, or whatever you call it, in videogames are meant as a way to progress once your gear is maxxed out.


If the game was not balanced with engineering in mind, I wouldn't mind a slower progression. But as it is, it would be terrible.
Engineering isn't balanced at all though. Engineering takes you from "somewhat challenging" to "trivial". Unlike most games that get harder the deeper you get into the game, this one gets easier.

We've already discussed how the experience you gain as a pilot allows you to gain credits more efficiently. You also get better at combat, and you understand risks and know how to mitigate those risks. Your skill continually rises as you play the game. With Engineering, your raw power rises too. It doesn't require any of those "endgame" skills to engineer your gear. A total beginner can perform the activities necessary to engineer a ship. All it requires is time spent.
You do not need engineering to further engineer your gear, so there is no progression there. There are only "partially complete" stages where you haven't put in sufficient time to collect all the materials.
Engineering ultimately takes the last remaining challenging content in the game and makes it trivial. An "endgame" engineered ship can AFK their way to wins in a CZ. Engineering doesn't make things possible, it makes things easier. It is not progression, it is anti-progression.
 
Apart from a thorough 'spring clean' re-balancing of every single part of the game I can't really see what else could be done, and that cause a lot of complaints from one player group or another.

Well we have death in game we just need optional taxes :)
 
I've plateau'd with my main CMDR - FC, 1.5bn in the bank (got a massive boost of 700m as a result of that silly CG this week on top of that, and I didn't even try hard for that), fleet of all ships (except C4) so 37 vessels, all A-rated where needed and at least G3 engineered, mostly G4/5 with special effects applied.

My mat hunger as you describe it @photomankc is much diminished also, which is why I could just dump a lot of data into the last CG without batting an eyelid. I've replaced one stack of currency I have no use for with another stack of currency which I have no use for.

With EDO landing shortly I'll continue to be busy, but I'm not sure yet what the goal will really be as such. Exploration is one thing (purely sightseeing the new planet tech should be worth it), but I don't need another fleet; I thought about deleting my ships including engineered modules, but I'll just repeat what I already have now. I will have to think about that as some of my ships are becoming a bit stale now. BGS work might be more interesting with EDO, depending on mission variety.

Will have to see how long that all lasts - at least my fleet provides me with many options if nothing else - I have a build for every single activity and some ships are even surplus to demand as I can't find a role for them that isn't already covered by another ship. Luxury problem to have of course, but the more stuff I have the more I tend to get bored with it, funnily enough.
 
If you are owner of a fleet carrier, the weekly upkeep is likely just one mission, or you have deposited several years upkeep upfront alreay.
Owning a fleet carrier increases your potential cr/hr profitability. The costs of owning a fleet carrier is trivial compared to it. The only folks who might worry about funding their fleet carriers are the types that would fly their fresh E rated anaconda with only 1M in the bank.
 
If you are owner of a fleet carrier, the weekly upkeep is likely just one mission, or you have deposited several years upkeep upfront alreay.
Ah yeah I know - I was just joking about it as a number of people seem to take issue with it so much. I actually think it's too low. About 50m for a fully loaded carrier would be something I'd have no problem with. Would actually give me an incentive to make some credits for a change.

But I also don't run mine as a profit, but a cost centre. It's a service that makes my CMDR's life easier, and I'm happy to pay for it in credits that I can't find anything else to spend on.
 
I used to tie up some of my credits by buying as many outfitting modules for my carrier (some can go into the billions but often contain modules that I don't want/need and which also tend to increase the package price, to add insult to injury) - not necessarily with a view to sell them but to enable me to switch modules around without having to travel to ShinDez every time. Doesn't work for tech broker stuff but still nice to bring along (eg. need a fuel scoop, SRV, collector limpet on your combat ship temporarily? No problem).

The problem is it really eats into your FC space leaving less for Tritium and other misc. commodities, which I'm quite fond to accumulate (and later sell, either to station or via my own market). Certainly a good way of reducing one's credit balance.
 
As for credit bloat - political donations, that’s been my solution. Whenever I land at a Federal port and a Federal faction is asking for donations on the mission board, I cough up, always. The Federation obliges me to. Not the Empire though, scallywags that they are.

Same game save since Gamma 2014 and still “only” 800 million credits (and just one ship, by choice). To the Federation, I am an allied honorary admiral; to the Empire, I am but an impoverished ‘serf’ at minus-8 Neutral (in the red).

That’s just my way of playing.

Forward the Federation!
 
Top Bottom