Animal still stressed while in trade center?

I had some tortoises that grew up, and of course as soon as this happens (after like 500 years game time), they become stressed due to overcrowding etc. So I put the ones I wanted to keep or sell in the trade center (released the rest), the way I usually do when animals reach maturity. Put some of them up for sale. But for some reason, the stressed message won't go away.

I've never had animals remain stressed when in the trade center before. Is this one of those things that restarting the zoo resolves? Is this a new feature since the last patch?
 
Reloading doesn't help. I'm often experiencing this with my Jaguars. Put the Animals in a Enclosure and wait until they are no longer stressed, then put them back into the Trade Center
 
I had this issue way before 1.5 patch, so its not something new. As Urufu is suggesting, only way around this is not putting stressed animals into trade center currently. I always have an improvise habitat near quaranteen, where the guests cannot enter this area, so I put the stressed animals there until the stress levels are normal, and only then put them to trade center.
 
I had this issue way before 1.5 patch, so its not something new. As Urufu is suggesting, only way around this is not putting stressed animals into trade center currently. I always have an improvise habitat near quaranteen, where the guests cannot enter this area, so I put the stressed animals there until the stress levels are normal, and only then put them to trade center.
Does this Problem only exist with Stress or also if the Animal is in a bad Mood without being stressed? Would be great to be able to do this with a second Enclosure that is just to get rid of the Stress but without designing a second one that is completely suitable. Don't really like it to put my Animals in Danger (fighting Big Cats) just because of a Bug
 
Does this Problem only exist with Stress or also if the Animal is in a bad Mood without being stressed? Would be great to be able to do this with a second Enclosure that is just to get rid of the Stress but without designing a second one that is completely suitable. Don't really like it to put my Animals in Danger (fighting Big Cats) just because of a Bug
Only with stress in my case. That is why I have the "quaranteen enclosure" that is very simple, it has water, basic shelter but basically no plants since it would not be suitable for all animals anyway. So the animals are not completely happy there but its just for a moment until their stress go away.
 
Only with stress in my case. That is why I have the "quaranteen enclosure" that is very simple, it has water, basic shelter but basically no plants since it would not be suitable for all animals anyway. So the animals are not completely happy there but its just for a moment until their stress go away.
Great then I'll maybe build a Stable somewhere in my Zoo where I can put the Animals in to get rid of the Stress🙂👍
 
There hasn't been any way to un-stress the tortoises in that enclosure once they hit maturity, unfortunately. It just wasn't big enough for all those adult tortoises, and the only option was to take them to trade center to sell. Fortunately, they were ultimately purchased, and the message went away.

I created an "off exhibit" area for my tortoises now, since they seem to get stressed continually now that guest numbers are up, and when there are several in the habitat, at least a couple are always stressed. And they take forever to retreat to the hidden areas.

All the signs and hiding spots make no difference in their lovely little habitat. They just hate people and are really bothered by noise, which is odd for creatures with no external ear and very poor hearing outside of the very low frequency range.
 
which is odd for creatures with no external ear and very poor hearing outside of the very low frequency range
Didn't know about that. Thanks.

With external Ear you mean what only Mammals have anyways? If not it would be really strange because if that's not what you've meant, that would probably mean that they don't have a Opening for it at all😶

I assume it makes Sense that they don't need to hear very good. I think both Giant Tortoises in the Game don't have any natural Predators and they also aren't very social

I wonder if they even get stressed that easy in Real Life
It seems like they like being touched and I think I've heard once that it was allowed to enter a Enclosure in a Breeding Center on one of the Galapagos Islands until some stupid Idiot decided to try riding a Tortoise
 
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Only mammals have an auricle or pinna, which is the flap outside the external ear opening, along with three middle ear bones "behind" the eardrum (hammer, anvil, stirrup).

But birds and some other reptiles (zoologists now classify birds with the reptiles--bit of trivia--last of the dinosaurs) do have an opening in the side of the head with the eardrum right below it, and they have the "stirrup bone" in the middle ear to transmit sound. As an aside, the other two middle ear ossicle bones that mammals have are derived from ancestral jawbones that were repurposed in mammals but still present in birds/reptiles. It's a beautifully documented evolutionary transition in the fossil record.

I wouldn't say mammals hear better than birds and lizards, though having an external pinna makes it easy to localize sounds. Maybe birds compensate for the lack of an ear flap by having such flexible necks and constantly moving their heads around. Birds clearly have excellent hearing.

But snakes and turtles/tortoises lack even the opening to the outside with the eardrum. They pick up low frequency sounds and vibrations through their jawbones, but they don't "hear" high pitched sounds and have pretty limited airborne sound range in general. With snakes, the thought is that they evolved from an ancestor that became a burrower, so losing limbs and eyelids and external ear openings made sense, though many (most) snakes today spend most of their time above ground.

I'm not sure there's a strong hypothesis why turtles and tortoises lost their ear opening. They branched off from the other non amphibian vertebrates early on and are just different in a lot of ways besides their shells. It's certainly the case that they live close to the ground and don't climb or do other things where hearing airborne sounds from far away is super helpful, and early turtles seem to have been an aquatic group.

If real zoo tortoises get stressed by lots of guests around their enclosures, it may be because they are picking up on their footsteps and other lower frequency sounds, of course.
 
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But snakes and turtles/tortoises lack even the opening to the outside with the eardrum. They pick up low frequency sounds and vibrations through their jawbones, but they don't "hear" high pitched sounds and have pretty limited airborne sound range in general. With snakes, the thought is that they evolved from an ancestor that became a burrower, so losing limbs and eyelids and external ear openings made sense, though many (most) snakes today spend most of their time above ground.

I'm not sure there's a strong hypothesis why turtles and tortoises lost their ear opening. They branched off from the other non amphibian vertebrates early on and are just different in a lot of ways besides their shells. It's certainly the case that they live close to the ground and don't climb or do other things where hearing airborne sounds from far away is super helpful, and early turtles seem to have been an aquatic group.
Thanks, didn't know that. I assumed the Opening would just be hard to see.


If real zoo tortoises get stressed by lots of guests around their enclosures, it may be because they are picking up on their footsteps and other lower frequency sounds, of course.
🤔 Sounds like a good Answer. But maybe it could also be that they get stressed from seeing so many People at once. First we should find out if Giant Tortoises even get easily stressed in Captivity in Real Life
 
First we should find out if Giant Tortoises even get easily stressed in Captivity in Real Life
I've volunteered at breeding centre in the Galapagos and can say that they do hide in their shells and hiss at you if you get too close (with the exception of one tortoise who loved neck rubs). They didn't really seem to care if you just watched from a distance, though guest numbers were never more than about a dozen at a time so I can't really speak to the impacts of large numbers of guests.
 
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